Q/. What is Frugal Living?


 Answer/.

Frugal living is all about living better for less, and since your definition of better is going to be a bit different from everyone else’s, your definition of frugal living is also going to be a bit different.

Frugal living can be seen as:

  • A way to get by on a tight budget
  • An opportunity to live more simply
  • A debt reduction strategy
  • An effort to consume less
  • A way to afford the life that you want

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved. We Guarantee your confidentiality by promising not to pass your details to any third party, neither will we publish your personal details.

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Q/. Only teenage girls suffer with Eating Disorders?


 Answer/.


Although it is true that eating disorders are most common in teenage girls, this is a condition that is also apparent in boys and young men, and can develop in middle age for both males and females.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved

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Q/. Does Benefit dependency affect Poverty?


 Answer/.

  • Some claim that the UK benefits system has created a culture of dependency and as a result, claimants are reluctant to help themselves by looking for work.
  • In fact, the inadequacy of benefits tells us much about the financial incentives that claimants have to look for work.
  • Data also shows that many claimants rely on benefits for only short periods of time. For example, 67 per cent of Jobseekers Allowance claimants find work within 6 months while a further 22 per cent are no longer claiming benefits after 12 months.2
  • Recent Department for Work and Pensions focus group research offers an interesting insight into job-seeking behaviour of a sample of claimants.3 It showed that while 22 per cent of the group were not actively looking for work, half of these dedicated their energies instead to their families, a statistic that speaks to other types of important work that claimants may undertake but which has no monetary value.

Question and Answer courtesy of C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Can poverty be influenced by Family breakdown?


 Answer/.

  • It is true to say that lone parents are at a higher risk of living in poverty than average but family breakdown again provides an inadequate explanation of poverty in the UK.
  • In 2009/10, HBAI shows that 63 per cent of children in poverty lived in families with two parents.
  • A recent study has also shown that marriage does not offer a solution to poverty. Instead, factors such as the lack of affordable childcare and flexible jobs offer more plausible reasons why many lone parent families struggle to make ends meet.

Question and Answer courtesy of C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Does Drugs and alcohol dependency affect poverty?


 Answer/.

  • Drug and alcohol misuse is often given as a reason why people live in poverty.
  • While it is sensible to assume that people who do misuse drugs and alcohol find it challenging to function in the workplace and other areas of life, the statistics show that such behaviour is far from typical for low income families.
  • A 2008 Government study estimated that 6.6 per cent of the total number of benefit claimants in England were problem drug users.1
  • While drug misuse may prove to be a key reason this group of people finds it hard to escape poverty, it clearly has no explanatory power for the other 93.4 per cent of claimants.

Question and Answer courtesy of C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. How can we eradicate poverty


 Answer/.

Child poverty is not inevitable: in the past, child poverty levels have been significantly lower in the UK, and they are lower today in many other comparable countries.

So what needs to be done to end child poverty?

First, there needs to be greater political will to tackle the problem. If you are interested in helping us generate political will, go to our campaigns pages now.

Second, this will must be translated into action. If you are interested in which actions we believe are critical to end child poverty, go to our policy pages now.

And third, child poverty requires cultural change. If you are interested in challenging your own, or others, perceptions of people who live in poverty in the UK, go to our myth-busting pages now.

Question & Answer courtesy of C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is the impact of poverty?


 Answer/.

Poverty damages. It damages childhoods; it damages life chances; and it damages us all in society.

In 2008 a report estimated that child poverty costs the UK at least £25 billion each year. Reduced educational opportunities which generate lower skills and productivity and lower taxes are estimated to account for £17 billion, while higher service costs make up the remainder.

Education

  • Children from poorer backgrounds lag at all stages of education.
  • By the age of three, poorer children are estimated to be, on average, nine months behind children from more wealthy backgrounds.
  • According to Department for Education statistics, by the end of primary school, pupils receiving free school meals are estimated to be almost three terms behind their more affluent peers.
  • By 14, this gap grows to over five terms.
  • By 16, children receiving free school meals achieve 1.7 grades lower at GCSE.

Health

  • Poverty is also associated with a higher risk of both illness and premature death.
  • Children born in the poorest areas of the UK weigh, on average, 200 grams less at birth than those born in the richest areas.
  • Children from low income families are more likely to die at birth or in infancy than children born into richer families.
  • They are more likely to suffer chronic illness during childhood or to have a disability.
  • Poorer health over the course of a lifetime has an impact on life expectancy: professionals live, on average, 8 years longer than unskilled workers.

Communities

  • Children living in poverty are almost twice as likely to live in bad housing. This has significant effects on both their physical and mental health, as well as educational achievement
  • Fuel poverty also affects children detrimentally as they grow up. A recent report showed the fuel gap has increased from was £256 in 2004 to £402 in 2009, and that low income families do sometimes have to make a choice between food and heating.5
  • Children from low income families often forgo events that most of us would take for granted. They miss school trips; can’t invite friends round for tea; and can’t afford a one-week holiday away from home.
  • While studies show that there are more play areas in deprived areas, their quality is generally poorer. Vandalism, playground misuse and danger of injury all act as deterrents to using what otherwise might be good facilities

Question & Answer courtesy of C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Who lives in Poverty?


 Answer/.

All types of people live in poverty. Life changes such as unemployment, illness or family separation can happen to us all. Shifts in the cost of living, especially higher prices in essentials such as food and fuel, also affect most people. So poverty isn’t something that happens to others. It’s something that can happen to almost anyone.

But certain groups of people face a much higher risk of living in poverty than others.

Families with children

  • Families with children are more likely to be poor than people without children.
  • This makes sense: costs go up with the birth of a child at the same time as family income goes down with parents cutting back on work or paying for childcare.
  • In 2009/10, 53 per cent of those living below the poverty line had children.

Lone parents

  • Lone parents are more likely to experience poverty than those in a couple.
  • In 2009/10, lone parent families were almost twice as likely to live in poverty than two parent families.

People with a disability

  • Disability is strongly connected to poverty.
  • Parents with disabilities often face multiple barriers to work; children with disabilities place additional demands on the family.
  • In 2009/10, families with at least one disabled member were 30 per cent more likely to live in poverty than families without disabilities.

Certain ethnic minorities

  • Certain ethnic minorities are also more likely to live in poverty.
  • As with people with disabilities, discrimination in the workplace clearly plays a role in depressing incomes.
  •  In 2009/10, people from ethnic minorities were 64 per cent more likely to live in poverty than average.

Workless families or households

  • Householads where only one adult works are at a much higher risk of poverty than average.
  • When benefits are set at too low a level they fail to act as a safety net for these families.
  • In 2009/10, families with one or more workless parent were seven times more likely to live below the poverty line than those where both parents had jobs.

Those living in Inner London

  • The high costs of living and especially housing in London puts extra pressure on low income families.
  • In 2009/10, families living in the capital were one and a half times more likely to live in poverty than families living outside London.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What causes Poverty?


 Answer/.

Poverty is a complex phenomenon. It is caused by a range of factors which work together and result in inadequate resources.

Worklessness

  • This is a major cause of poverty. In 2009/10, 42 per cent of all families below the UK poverty line contained no working members.
  • There are numerous reasons people do not work. Some of these reasons are personal: many people have caring responsibilities, others suffer from a health condition or have a disability while some encounter discrimination that acts as a barrier to work.
  • But there are also structural reasons why people do not work. For example, if the labour market does not provide enough jobs that match the skills and qualifications of unemployed people, or that are close enough to people’s homes, working is not a realistic option.

Low paid work

  • Even when people do work this is not always a route out of poverty. In 2009/10, 58 per cent of families below the UK poverty line contained at least one working member.
  • Low wages, part-time work and the high costs of childcare all conspire to reduce incomes.
  • Many low wage jobs offer no prospect of progression (‘low pay, low prospects’); others are insecure, providing only sporadic and unpredictable incomes (‘low pay, no pay’). As a result, they are often nothing more than poverty traps.

Inadequate benefits

  • In the UK, when people are out of work or earn insufficient amounts of money we expect the benefits and tax credit system to act as a safety net. In reality, however, benefits are set at levels that invariably leave recipients living below the poverty line.
  • In 2009/10, for example, we estimate that a family with one child claiming jobseeker’s allowance received only 65 per cent of the amount they required to live above the poverty line.

Question & Answer courtesy of  C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is poverty?


 Answer/.

When we think about poverty many of us recall TV images from the developing world: of famine, of shanty towns, or of children dying from preventable diseases. Yet this is clearly not what we observe in the UK.

So is there any poverty here?

Peter Townsend, the sociologist who did so much to advance our understanding of poverty and its relationship to wider society, and was also one of CPAG’s founders, certainly thought so. In 1979 Townsend defined poverty as follows:

Individuals, families and groups in the population can be said to be in poverty when they lack resources to obtain the type of diet, participate in the activities and have the living conditions and amenities which are customary, or at least widely encouraged and approved, in the societies in which they belong.1

As this definition makes clear, in affluent societies such as the UK poverty can only properly be understood in relation to the typical living standards in society.

Townsend’s definition also highlights that poverty is about a lack of resources. Poor people lack capital (both income and wealth). But they can also be resource-poor in other ways: they may lack human capital (such as education or good health), or social capital (such as positive and trustful communities). Yet it is money that, to a large extent, determines whether people are able to compensate for other shortfalls in their lives. That is why a lack of adequate financial resources is the decisive characteristic of poverty.

And as the information on this section of our website shows, poverty is indeed a fact of life for many living in the UK today.

Question & Answer courtesy of C.P.A.G

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. How can I get a tax credit decision changed?


 Answer/.


The revenue can revise a decision if there is a change of circumstances, if they have made a mistake or if they think your award is wrong. If you disagree with their decision you can appeal. The time limit for appealing is 30 days from the date of the decision. An appeal must be in writing and must say why you are appealing. Appeals can be made on form TC623, found at the leaflet ATC/AP available from the Revenue. Unless you are reporting a change of circumstances it is usually better to ask for an appeal rather than a revision. This is because the appeal deadline of 30 days is not extended if you ask for a revision and it is turned down. Late appeals are sometimes possible up to one year and 30 days after a decision. But a late appeal is only granted in ‘special circumstances’, so you should always try and make sure that you meet the normal appeal deadline.

For more information please telephone 0845 300 3900 (Textphone 0845 300 3909) Lines are open from 8am-8pm seven days a week.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. I am worried about my teenager drinking, what can I do?


 Answer/.

Talk about the dangers – from health to safety.
Observe and talk to your child if you are worried.
Use every opportunity to discuss alchohol and drug use, for example, when drugs or alcohol are mentioned in a television programme. You can give accurate information regarding the risks of substance use.
Ensure that you are informed about alcohol and drug use and the effects. There are many helpful guides available from the helplines listed below.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. My child has been threatened with exclusion from his school. What is exclusion and what are my rights as a parent?


 Answer/.

When a child or young person is excluded from school it can be a difficult and upsetting time for them and their families. Only the head teacher can exclude a pupil. In the absence of the head teacher the most senior member of staff present may decide to exclude a pupil.

A decision to exclude a pupil should only be taken:

  • in response to serious breaches of the school’s behaviour policy
  • if allowing the pupil to remain in school would seriously harm the education or welfare of the pupil or others in the school

There are two types of exclusion:

1. Fixed exclusions:
These are for a limited specified number of days and there is a clear date for the pupil to return to school. A pupil cannot be excluded for more than 45 days in a school year. During the time a pupil is excluded for a fixed period the school remains responsible for setting and marking school work for the pupil.

2. Permanent exclusions:
These areusually the final step in a process of dealing with disciplinary offences after all other methods have been tried without success. However a head teacher can exclude a pupil for a serious “one-off” offence. Until the end of the exclusion process the school is still responsible for making continued arrangements for the pupil’s education.

For both types of exclusion parents have the right to put their case in writing to the school governors. In some circumstances parents have an automatic right to meet the governors in person to put their case forward if they disagree with the governor’s original decision. For permanent exclusions parents also have the right to appeal to an independent panel if the governors have upheld the permanent exclusion

Spotlight on Education. For all fact sheets relating to Education Click here.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. How can I get my teenager to talk to me more?


 Answer/.

The teenage years are tough for your child, so try to understand what they are going through. Accept that friendships, music, their own opinions and most other things are more important that you right now! Despite this, knowing that you are there for them, gives your teenager the confidence to try new things.
Other useful contacts are:-

www.ukparentslounge.com
Parentline Plus 0808 800 2222 www.parentlineplus.org.uk
www.raisingkids.co.uk
www.bbc.co.uk/health

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is the difference between drug use and drug misuse?


 Answer/.

Drug use means the intake of a drug. Generally the term ‘use’ means the consumption of a drug that does not cause any immediate harm to a person although it may still carry some risks of harm.

Drug misuse means the use of drugs that causes harm to a persons health or lifestyle leading to dependence (addiction) to drugs or which leads to problematic or harmful behavior. Drug misuse is often linked to the use of more than one drug at the same time.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. At what age can a child be left alone?


 Answer/.

Children under 13 years should not be left alone.
If you are worried about a child being left alone, talk to the parent, a Health Visitor, Teacher or a Social Worker.

For further advice please contact the following:-
NSPCC National Helpline 0808 800 5000
NSPCC Asian Helpline 0800 096 7719
National Council for One Parent Families Helpline 0800 018 5026
Redcar and Cleveland Children’s Services Department 01642 771500

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Can I be fined for taking my child on holiday during term time?


 Answer/.

Term time holidays should be the exception, not the rule. All family holidays should be taken, as far as possible, during the school holiday periods. Penalty Notices of upto £100 have been introduced through the Anti Social Behaviour Act (February 27th 2004) and could be enforced by the Local Authority if appropriate. Two weeks holiday in term time every year (with no other absences) means that your child can only ever achieve 95% attendance and will miss about two terms in a school career.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is the Disabled facilities Grant?


 Answer/.

Disabled Facilities Grants are paid to cover the costs of adapting a property to allow a person with a disability to continue living there. They are paid by your local council, which must approve the work before any grant is awarded. An occupational therapist, Home Improvement Agency (HIA), local Environmental or Housing Departments can also advise on what adaptations may be appropriate. You must find out what work is required and how much it will cost before applying. Some councils keep a list of approved builders and architects.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What are Able to pay Schemes?


 Answer/.

if you do not qualify for a grant we can help you find an affordable option for you to achieve the energy efficiency measures you need for a warmer, healthier home.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is the Education Welfare Service?


 Answer/.


The Education Welfare Service aims to ensure that children and young people fully benefit from the educational opportunities available to them. To achieve this, the Education Welfare Service works with children and young people, their families, educational services and establishments and other statutory and voluntary agencies.

All schools in Redcar & Cleveland are visited regularly by one of the team of Education Welfare Officers (EWOs). The EWOs encourage regular attendance at school and help to resolve any problems, which may be affecting pupils’ school attendance. The service can also advise and assist in areas such as child protection, bullying, exclusion from school, special educational needs. All of these issues can have a significant effect on attendance.

The law makes parents responsible for ensuring that their children of compulsory school age (5 to 16) receive a suitable, full-time education. In Redcar & Cleveland, the Education Welfare Service (on behalf of the Local Authority) is responsible for ensuring that parents fulfil this duty.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Why should I talk to my son/daughter about sex?


 Answer/.

Young people are starting to have sex younger and younger. Don’t assume that this won’t happen to your teenager. By the time you see the warning signs it may be too late to give them the help they need. Make sure they learn about sex early on.
For further information please refer to the Safe Parenting Handbookwww.redcar-cleveland.gov.uk/childprotection
They are many leaflets, books and website that can give advice.
Useful contacts are:
Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Support Service – Redcar and Cleveland 01642 479324
Sexwise Helpline 0800 28 29 30
Ask Brook 0800 018 5023 or visit www.brook.org.uk
Parentline Plus 0808 800 2222 or visit www.parentlineplus.org.uk
NHS Direct 0845 4647 or visit www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk
Sense CDs www.sensecds.com
British Pregnancy Advisory Service 08457 30 40 30 visit www.bpas.org

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. My child has been skipping school, how do I know he/she is at school?


 Answer/.

Notice what times your child is around, if they should be in school and check up if they say school has allowed them out. You may not even know until you are told by the school or Police.
Find out why your child is missing school and talk about any problems such as bullying or fear of failure. Discuss what your child wants for their future and how to reach short-term goals. If you take an active interest in their education they are more likely to talk to you when problems arise.
You can also gain information and advice from the following:-
Parentline Plus 0808 800 2222 www.parentlineplus.org.uk
www.parentscentre.gov.uk
www.ukparentslounge.com

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. The school wants to refer my child to the Learning Support team, how can they help?


 Answer/.

The Learning Support Service is a specialist teaching service. It is made up of teachers with specialist qualifications and experience in helping children with specific learning difficulties (including dyslexia and dyscalculia). They provide consultation and advice, carry out assessments, provide support for individuals and groups and provide training for teachers and other.
Please check the service entry in the directory for further details.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Why Is It So Hard to Get a Diagnosis for Disabilities?


 Answer/.

There are many things that can cause disability in a child. Difficulties during pregnancy, prematurity, genetic conditions or trauma during birth itself can all be relevant. In some cases it’s impossible to single out a specific cause – especially where children have a range of health problems that do not fit easily into any known syndrome. A syndrome is a characteristic pattern, or group of symptoms, which often appear in combination with one another.

Some children have a rare disorder, which may only affect a handful of other children across the country or perhaps none at all. It’s harder for doctors to diagnose a condition they’ve never seen before, and where there are very few studies which would make it possible to compare the features of your child’s difficulties with other cases. Many conditions have quite similar features and symptoms, which can also make it hard to be specific about your child’s particular condition.

Soem features may not appear until your child id older, when it will become more obvious that they are affected by a particular syndrome or disorder. More and more syndromes are being discovered each year, so it may be that a diagnosis will be achieved for your child in the future, even if it does not seem to be possible now.

If you feel strongly that all avenues to getting a diagnosis have not been explored, you should certainly discuss this with your child’s doctor and request a second opinion. But sometimes everything that can be done has been done and you are still left with no diagnosis.

For more information please visit: www.earlysupport.org.uk

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. How do I get a Grant for Energy Efficiency Measures


 Answer/.

If you receive benefits, you may be eligible for free insulation and measures under the Government’s grant schemes. We will assist in the application process and make sure things run smoothly.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is a drug?


 Answer/.


The term ‘drug’ is used to describe something that changes the way you think or feel. This can include both legal and illegal substances such as alcohol, tobacco, illegal drugs like cannabis or cocaine as well as prescription medication and solvents or glue.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is the Behaviour for Learning Support Service?


 Answer/.

The Behaviour Support Service is a specialist teaching service. The team is made up of specialist qualified teachers, an instructor/unqualified teacher and clerical staff. The team provide advice and support with behaviour difficulties, they support the development and implementation of behaviour policies. They observe, assessment and support individual children that require extra support around behavioural issues.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. I think my daughter is using drugs, what are the signs?


 Answer/.

Moody, lack of personal hygiene, lack of interest in everyday things, coming home late, change of friendship groups are all signs of drug use however they could be just the signs of being a teenager. There are not any clear signs of drug use but look out for loss of appetite, red eyes, money regularly going missing and unusual equipment such as burnt foil, torn cigarette packets, cut up plastic bottles and home made pipes.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. What is a Home Energy Efficiency Assessment


 Answer/.

- this determines the energy efficiency measures your home requires to make it warmer and healthier to live in. It’s a simple survey that does not take too long.

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

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Q/. Where can I get support if I don’t know why my child needs help?


 Answer/.

Many areas in the UK have a local parents’ support group where families’ of children with all kinds of disabilities come together for mutual support and contact. It might be helpful to find out if there’s one near you. Even if you had a diagnosis, it’s unlikely that another child in the group would have the same condition. However, a lot of issues you face on a day-to-day basis will be familiar to other parents and they often have practical advice to share. Local groups have the advantage of meeting regularly and locally, which can be important in providing a support network, if you need one. Another advantage is that other members can pass on information about support and services that are available in your area and that they have already used.

For more information please visit: www.earlysupport.org.uk

Please note: Ffeirio© is NOT a medical advice service – consult your doctor for specific advice.

Abridged disclaimer (full disclaimer): This information & advice is intended solely for UK & Cymru residents and is of a general nature only and no person should act in reliance on any statement contained in the information provided and at all times should obtain specific advice from an Expert, Doctor or professional. All rights reserved.

Ask a Question?